Forged titanium with 18ct gold, comprising two parts under tension.
M511

Early Jewellery

The roots of most of the themes and preoccupations that characterise Poston's jewellery can be traced back to his student days. He has had a lifelong interest in the interrelationship between jewellery and the body, tactility, flexibility, movement, assemblage, problem-solving, and issues around material 'values' and ethics.

Poston has always been absolutely clear on his views about the function of jewellery. In 1975 he wrote 'I believe absolutely that jewellery is for the wearer, not the spectator, since I believe it essential that people should be involved in their own existence rather than in the image of it. The primacy of the wearer demands that the jeweller pays close attention to how the piece of jewellery feels and works with the wearer's body, whether this is at a physical level or a more psychological one.' From this follows his focus on tactility, flexibility and movement.

I believe absolutely that jewellery is for the wearer, not the spectator, since I believe it essential that people should be involved in their own existence rather than in the image of it

David Poston

1974

Bracelet, 1979
Stainless steel and red plastic.
M289

Bracelet, 1979
Stainless steel
M293

Key Moments

1967

Begins diploma in Jewellery at Hornsey College

1968

Makes first numbered object 'Feelie' ring

1968

Hornsey Sit-In

1970

Graduates from college

1974

First feature in Crafts magazine

1975

Solo shows at two key venues: The Knotted String and Rubbish Company at the Arnolfini Gallery in Bristol and David Poston. A Tactile Approach to Jewellery at Electrum Gallery in London. Also exhibits in the pivotal exhibition, 'Jewellery in Europe'

1984

Begins Research Assistant post at Hull University, and moves away from making jewellery

David's account of the Hornsey Sit-In

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